Harold Ickes of the New Deal

his private life and public career by Graham J. White

Publisher: Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass

Written in English
Published: Pages: 263 Downloads: 563
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Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • Ickes, Harold L. 1874-1952,
  • Statesmen -- United States -- Biography,
  • New Deal, 1933-1939,
  • United States -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographies and index.

StatementGraham White and John Maze.
ContributionsMaze, J. R.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE748.I28 W54 1985
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 263 p. :
Number of Pages263
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2856601M
ISBN 100674372859
LC Control Number84019150

Harold LeClaire Ickes () Harold Ickes was born in Franklin Township, Pennsylvania, on Ma He attended the University of Chicago, from which he received both a . Born in rural western Pennsylvania, Harold LeClair Ickes (), son of a gambler, womanizer, drunk father and of a strictly reared Presbyterian mother, grew up desperately poor and desperately ambitious. He became a Chicago newsman during its gilded era, a key figure in the Progressive. Harold Ickes. Sec of the Interior. who led the PWA. NRA Codes. encouraged among competing businesses to work together a set of hours, prices, production levels and wages. Complained the new deal was destroying the Constitution and free enterprise. AJ Smith. led the dissatisfied democrats of the New Deal. Harold LeClaire Ickes served as Secretary of the Interior for thirteen years, earning the distinction of being the second-longest serving cabinet member in U.S. history. Under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Ickes oversaw the Public Works Administration (PWA), one of the most successful New Deal programs.

Harold Ickes was born in Franklin Township, Pennsylvania, on Ma He attended the University of Chicago, from which he received both a B.A. () and an LL.D. (). After finishing law school, Ickes practiced in Chicago, where he also served as a Republican committeeman. 1 drawing. | Cartoon shows President Roosevelt showing Secretary of the Interior, Harold Ickes a drawing for a "New Deal Plan for Enlarged Supreme Court" featuring the existing court building flanked by two enormous wings. Ickes headed the Public Works Administration which mounted a huge public building program during the Depression. The cartoonist pokes fun at Roosevelt's proposal to add new.   The New Deal A Modern History (Book): Hiltzik, Michael A.: Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal began as a program of short-term emergency relief measures and evolved into a truly transformative concept of the federal government's role in Americans' lives. More than an economic recovery plan, it was a reordering of the political system that continues to define America to this day. The research arm of the Living New Deal is hosted by the Department of Geography at the University of California, Berkeley. The public service branch of the Living New Deal is a California non-profit organization. The Living New Deal is funded by a mix of public grants and private donations. Join Us. The Living New Deal is a crowdsourced project.

Websites on the New Deal; New Deal Book Reviews; New Deal Bibliographies; Films & Videos on the New Deal; New Deal Resources for Teachers; See note 7 below; and T.H. Watkins, Righteous Pilgrim: The Life and Times of Harold L. Ickes, , New York: Henry Holt and Company, , pp. ; and generally, Hallie Flanagan, Arena, New. "The political ideas that resulted from confronting the crisis of the Great Depression and the New Deal of the early 20th century reshaped America. This documentary history collects a range of primary sources to illuminate this critical period in U.S. history"-- Provided by publisher. 60 Smithfield Blvd, Plattsburgh mi ()

Harold Ickes of the New Deal by Graham J. White Download PDF EPUB FB2

Harold Ickes of the New Deal: His Private Life and Public Career Hardcover – April 1, by Graham White (Author), John Maze (Author) Cited by: 3. Harold Ickes of the New Deal [White, Graham, Maze, John] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Harold Ickes of the New Deal. Roosevelt's Warrior: Harold L. Ickes and the New Deal: Clarke, Professor Jeanne Nienaber: : Books. 9 used & new from $Cited by: 9. A New Deal Hero Harold Ickes of the New Deal by Graham White and John Maze (Harvard University Harold Ickes of the New Deal book, pp., $20) The title of this book gives the reader hope that the authors will open a window.

Ickes worked hard at his job while he did his utmost to drive the New Deal to the left. He was a model of public probity, despite his personal depravities.

After reading Clarke's book, one is left with the impression that Ickes was the kind of man you could trust with your wallet, but could not leave alone for an instant with your daughter.

Jeanne Nienaber Clarke's biography of Harold L. Ickes focuses primarily onwhen he served not only as Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Secretary of the Interior but also as director of the Public Works Administration (PWA) and as oil production "czar" charged with ameliorating the boom-and-bust tendencies of the industry.

RIGHTEOUS PILGRIM The Life and Times of Harold L. Ickes, By T. Watkins. Illustrated. 1, pp. New York: Henry Holt & Company. $ THIS huge biography of Harold L. Ickes. Harold L. Ickes: New Deal Hatehet Man A XxT THE Democratic National Convention the keynote speaker referred to Vice-President Richard Nixon as the "vice-hatchet man" of the Republican party.

This reference was but a new play upon an old epithet, for Nixon is only one of many campaigners to whom the "hatchet man" label has been applied. Verified Purchase. Harold Ickes was known as "the curmudgeon," and this diary on Franklin D.

Roosevelt's first term does not disappoint. It starts with Roosevelt's first cabinet meeting, to discuss the banking crisis, and ends at Roosevelt's landslide s: 6. Harold Ickes of the New Deal: His Private Life and Public Career: Author: Graham J.

White: Contributor: J. Maze: Edition: illustrated: Publisher: Harvard University Press, Original from. Contents. Very little has been written about Harold Ickes, one of the most important, complex, and colorful figures of the New Deal.

By any standards his public career was remarkable. For thirteen turbulent years as Interior Secretary and as head of the Public Works Administration he was an uncommonly effective official and a widely acknowledged leader of liberal by: 3. Very little has been written about Harold Ickes, one of the most important, complex, and colorful figures of the New Deal.

White and Maze uncover the psychological imperatives and conscious ideals of Ickes' unknown private life that illuminate his public career. Books Advanced Search New Releases Best Sellers & More Children's Books Textbooks Textbook Rentals Best Books of the Month of results for "harold ickes" Skip to main search results.

By any measure, Harold Ickes was one of the towering figures of the New Deal. With remarkable energy and a genius for organization, he transformed a tradition-bound, much-maligned Department of the Interior into a progressive and highly respected organization.

He was known for his sharp wit and brilliant intellect. He could be crusty, temperamental, and self-righteous. And he was just the kind. Very little has been written about Harold Ickes, one of the most important, complex, and colorful figures of the New Deal.

By any standards his public career was remarkable. For thirteen turbulent years as Interior Secretary and as head of the Public Works Administration he was an uncommonly effective official and a widely acknowledged leader of liberal reform.

Background. Ickes was born in Baltimore, Maryland to Harold L. Ickes and Jane Dahlman. Ickes is a graduate of Stanford University (, AB, Economics) and Columbia Law was a student civil rights activist in the s and took part in Freedom Summer. He has practiced labor law for many years in New York is founder and president emeritus of civic data firm Catalist.

By design on J Comments Off on The New Deal’s Curmudgeon: Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior. By Ray Hill. More than a few historians rate Harold LeClair Ickes as the greatest Secretary of the Interior to serve in the Cabinet of any president.

Certainly, he served the longest, more than thirteen years. Book Series; New Publications; Upcoming Publications; Add Note; Print; Save; Cite; Your opinion; Email; Share; Show Summary Details.

White, Graham / Maze, John Harold Ickes of the New Deal His Private Life and Public Career. HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS $ / 48,00 € / £* Add to Cart. eBook (PDF) Reprint Publication Date: April   The New Deal had more acronyms than a James Bond novel and behind each was a huge personality.

“Johnson was a shouter, a table-pounder, a West Point man with a. Buy a cheap copy of Harold Ickes of the New Deal book by Graham White. Free shipping over $ Two political titans forge a modern city and a vibrant public sector in this history of strong leadership at a time of national crisis.

City of Ambition is a brilliant history of the New Deal and its role in the making of modern New York City. The story of a remarkable collaboration between Franklin Roosevelt and Fiorello La Guardia, this is a case study in creative political leadership in the.

There has never been a phenomenon in American life to equal the invasion of Washington by the young New Dealers--hundreds of men and women still in their twenties and thirties, brilliant and dedicated, trained in the law, economics, public administration, technology, pouring into public life to do nothing less than restructure American society.

Harold Ickes cited America's 60 Families to argue for the New Deal, despite Lundberg's attacks on New Deal supporters. Ickes–Jackson speeches [ edit ] United States Secretary of the Interior Harold L. Ickes obliquely referred to the book in a December speech in which he declared that "the 60 families" had engineered the Great Depression.

Get this from a library. Harold Ickes of the New Deal: his private life and public career. [Graham J White; J R Maze] -- Very little has been written about Harold Ickes, one of the most important, complex, and colorful figures of the New Deal. By any standards. Titled The Secret Diary of Harold L.

Ickes, the set provided a unique insider's view of the New Deal and the World War II home front. He also wrote columns on political issues for the New York Post and New Republic magazine, and a series of articles for the Saturday Evening Post. The New Deal: A Modern History shows how Roosevelt, through the force of his personality, commanded the loyalty of the rock-ribbed fiscal conservative Lewis Douglas and the radical agrarian Rexford Tugwell alike; of Harold Ickes and Harry Hopkins, one a curmudgeonly miser, the other a spendthrift idealist; of Henry Morgenthau, gentleman farmer.

Harold L. Ickes, (born MaFrankstown Township, Pa., U.S.—died Feb. 3,Washington, D.C.), U.S. social activist who became a prominent member of the New Deal Democratic administration of Pres.

Franklin D. Roosevelt. Admitted to the Illinois bar inIckes early developed an aroused social conscience; he worked as a volunteer in a settlement house, frequently handled. Harold LeClair Ickes was a U.S. social activist who became a prominent member of the New Deal Democratic administration of Pres.

Franklin D. Roosevelt. Background Of Scottish and German ancestry, Ickes was born in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, the son of Matilda (McCune) and Jesse Boone Ickes. Writing about his career in Chicago and Washington during the Bull Moose and New Deal years, Harold L.

Ickes called his book "The Autobiography of a Curmudgeon.". HAROLD ICKES OF THE NEW DEAL His Private Life and Public Career.

By Graham White and John Maze. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press. Harold Ickes of the New Deal. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, (OCoLC) Named Person: Harold L Ickes; Harold Le Claire Ickes; Harold L Ickes; Harold L Ickes; Harold L Ickes: Material Type: Biography: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Graham J White; J R Maze; Mazal Holocaust Collection.To begin with, the New Deal featured the most enlightened and anti-racist federal leadership since Reconstruction.

Administrators such as Harry Hopkins, Frances Perkins, Harold Ickes, Hallie Flanagan, Aubrey Williams, and Ellen Woodward were deeply committed .The New Deal: A Modern History shows how Roosevelt, through the force of his personality, commanded the loyalty of the rock-ribbed fiscal conservative Lewis Douglas and the radical agrarian Rexford Tugwell alike; of Harold Ickes and Harry Hopkins, one a curmudgeonly miser, the other a spendthrift idealist; of Henry Morgenthau, gentleman farmer.